HOME | SAFARI CLOTHING | LEATHERMAN MULTI-TOOLS | GARMIN GPSs | MAGLITE TORCHES | ROGUE LEATHER HATS

QUALITY FOOTWEAR | RUBBER STAMPS | EMBROIDERY | LASER ENGRAVING | OTHER STUFF

JACANA STUFF

 HOME

SAFARI CLOTHING

LEATHERMAN MULTI-TOOLS
GARMIN GPSs
MAGLITE TORCHES
QUALITY FOOTWEAR

STUMBELBLOCS

ROGUE LEATHER HATS

RUBBER STAMPS

LASER ENGRAVING

EMBROIDERY

SPIDER CATCHER

OTHER STUFF

E-MAIL US

FIND OR CONTACT US

SITE MAP

 

The Wilmot Gallery

(All photos kindly supplied by the Wilmot family)

 

 

 

The Wilmot family first came to Botswana in the early 1900’s. Their family history closely tracks the development of Botswana.

Grandfather Cronje Wilmot's son Bobby Wilmot was part of the group that were involved in the early exploration and opening up of the Okavango Delta at a time when it was virtually unknown and unexplored. Bobby was known as a legendary crocodile hunter. His camp was on the site of the present Crocodile Camp in Maun today. He met his demise through the bite of a deadly Black Mamba snake. He had four daughters and a son.

Bobby's son Lloyd, once a hunter, now a conservationist, is a veritable mine of information. You name it – he’s done it. Swimming with elephants, tracking lion, leopard or cheetah on foot, building hides to view game at remote waterholes, following the amazing African migrations and more. His famous Lloyds Camp in Savuti was a legendary place of wonder and excitement and not surprisingly probably more credited in wildlife documentaries than any other camp in Botswana. It was here that Lloyd developed his special affinity for lions. It is not surprising that one delighted guest wrote of Lloyd. “While Lloyd is my shepherd I Wilmot fear…”

Daphne, one of Bobby's daughters, born in Botswana, has lived in the Maun area most of her life and has been running safaris for 35 years. Daphne provides the woman’s touch ensuring that guests are truly well looked after. Her table is legendary, conjuring wonderful 3 course meals in the middle of the African wild, under the stars and miles away from all mod cons. But it is as a game guide that Daphne is remembered with awe by her guests. She has a gentle way of getting you as close to the small wonders as to the big adventures. Her patience and eye for photography makes her an invaluable aid to the keen photographer.

 

Hazel, another daughter, lived in Maun for many years. She was a successful businesswoman who started the well known Maun Fresh Produce, which became the current Shoprite. She also built the Natlee Centre opposite Maun's airport entrance. After living in Franschoek in the Cape for some years, she has moved to St. Helena Island. Her daughter Natasha lives in Maun.

Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the photo

The Legendary Bobby Wilmot

Bobby Wilmot (left) with his father, Cronje. Pic taken in early 1960's on farm near Francistown

Lloyd and June at Savuti

June Wilmot, shortly after her marriage to Lloyd filling Baby Huey's drinking bowl

Brian Bridges with Mo Fraser. Rocky Palmer behind, left

Daphne Wilmot

Ryland Wallace, Hazel Wilmot & Bernie Truthe

Hazel Wilmot & Mark Muller

Jack Bousefield.

Jeff Bowles

Jeff Bowles

PJ Bestelink & Willie Engelbrecht

John Allott & Daphne Wilmot

Lionel Palmer

Mark Muller

Penny Barrow

Peter Sandenbergh

Pete Smith with Harry Selby

Soren Lindstrom

Terry Palmer

Terry Palmer

Ryland Wallace, Tim Liversedge & Old Man Wally Johnson

Willie Phillips

   

 

From 'Monarch Of All I Survey' by Sir Charles Rey (former Resident Commissioner of the Bechuanaland Protectorate) "And at 12.45 we arrived at the dreadful village of Maun, chief village of Ngamiland, and most desolate and forbidding of villages in the country." (16 June 1933)

 

Excerpt from "Monarch Of All I Survey" by Sir Charles Rey:

    Thursday 26 June, 1930. Maun is the administrative centre and principal village in the Ngamiland district. The main tribe are the Batawana, and there is perpetual trouble between them and a subject race, the Makoba, and also with the Damara, a tribe that was allowed to migrate here from German South West Africa some years ago owing to ill-treatment by the Germans after the Herero Rebellion.

    The Chief of the Batawana is Mathiba, a poor fish. He is quite loyal, and very pleasant, but as weak as dishwater - also tho' he is only forty-five he is so riddled by disease and drink that he can hardly walk.

    Maun is on the Okavango River, a very lovely broad stream, and the country round is jolly, well-wooded and grand ranching country - the cattle are in splendid condition, fine big beasts and lots of them. But the native village is too ghastly for words - nothing but sand - not a blade of grass - dirty, straggling, and untidy. There are four European stores, representing wealthy trading interests as this is a great cattle buying centre. But the Europeans, mostly a bit mixed in blood, are a ghastly crew. Of course this is a tropical place and very malarial, hot, and unhealthy in the rains and hardly anybody from the outside ever comes here. I am the first Resident Commissioner to come here for twenty years, and no female R.C. has ever been here - Ninon the first.

    We went down to Camp - a dilapidated collection of huts - and first of all I had a short talk with the Chief alone and tried to stir him up a bit. Then we met the whole tribe in Kgotla - Ninon was there, and sat through it all. They gave a sort of dance first - then a speech of welcome, and then got up and voiced their troubles, not many, and not serious.

    After this I gave them a lecture - told them they were lazy, ignorant, unprogressive and helpless - explained what I proposed to do for them, and what they had got to do to help - arranged to build a school - told them I was sending the Chief's son away to be educated and to get some military discipline at our police training camp in Gaberones, and generally raised Hail Columbia. I am bound to say they took it very well.

    Various matters were discussed and a few complaints raised: but in all these places they are so pleased to see a R.C. in the flesh for the first time that they are most amenable. The fact of being in uniform too makes a tremendous difference to the native mind - it is difficult for a European to understand this.

    The meeting lasted till past 1: then after lunching at the Residency I went back to Camp and met all the European men - traders, cattle-buyers, and storekeepers, mixed blood mostly, some Greeks and a couple of Jews - no self-respecting person could live here through the rains.

The above photograph and text from 'Monarch of All I Survey' is a copyright of The Botswana Society


The Botswana Society advances and spreads knowledge on all aspects of the nation's rich cultural heritage and natural environment. Its annual journal is Botswana Notes and Records.

P.O. Box 71, Gaborone, Botswana, Phone/Fax: +(267) 391-9745

Email: botsoc@info.bw, Web-site: www.botsoc.org.bw

 

 

 

Jacana Website Quick Links

The Jacana

Movie Info Page

The Jacana Actor's

Movie Credits Page

One Hundred

Iconic Images

Jacana Curmudgeon

Irreverent Quotations

Demotivational

Posters

Classic

Video Clips

Old Maun

Picture Gallery

The Jacana

Humour Library

The Jacana

Maun Phone Book

The African

Map Library

Home Welding

Projects

Jacana 500

Great Lives

The Jacana

General Library

The Jacana

Technical Library

The Jacana

Photo Library

Growing African

Indigenous Trees

Jacana

Dictionary of

Unusual Words

The Jacana

Crossword Library

The Botswana

GPS Co-Ord List

The Jacana

Astronomy Site

 

 

JACANA HOME PAGE | LEE OUZMAN PHOTO LIBRARY | CLASSIC VIDEO CLIPS | JACANA GREAT LIVES SITE

JACANA MOVIE INFO PAGE | ICONIC IMAGES | JACANA PHOTO LIBRARY | OLD MAUN PHOTO GALLERY

MAUN PHONE DIRECTORY | FREE FONTS | GENERAL LIBRARY | MAP LIBRARY | TECHNICAL LIBRARY

HOUSE PLANS LIBRARY | MAUN E-MAIL, WEBSITE & SKYPE LIST | BOTSWANA GPS CO-ORDINATES

JACANA ASTRONOMY SITE | MAUN SAFARI WEB LINKS | JACANA WEATHER PAGE

  JACANA CROSSWORD LIBRARY | DEMOTIVATIONAL POSTERS

 

This web page was last updated on: August 09, 2012